LAILA MAJNUN PDF

Layla and Majnun. Images from the Heritage Museum. From my early youth I have been intrigued by the love story of Majnun and Layla, two young lovers from Bedouin Arabia. I remember very well that during long, cold winter nights in Kabul, in the s, my mother would tell us the remarkable story of these two lovers, their intense, splendid romance, and their endless plights leading to their heartrending deaths. Years later, as a student of literature, I read the Persian romance of Laili and Majnun by Nezami Ganjawi CE and then came across several reworkings of this amazing romance.

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Ja'far Baisunghuri. This splendid painting is from a manuscript of the frequently illustrated story of Laila and Majnun by the twelfth-century Persian poet Nizami. It was commissioned by the Timurid prince Baisunghur of Herat, one of the greatest bibliophiles in all Islamic history, who gathered at his court the very best painters from Baghdad, Tabriz, Shiraz, and Samarkand to illustrate his matchless collection of books.

This illustration depicts Qais, the future "mad one" Majnun for love, and Laila, his beloved, who meet for the first time as children at a mosque school. The painting underscores the closely related aesthetics of figural painting and abstract calligraphy, architectural tiling and royal carpet weaving in traditional Islamic civilization, united here in a visual symphony of flat but dramatically colored patterns.

The scene depicts the child lovers framed in the mosque's prayer niche in order to emphasize their mystical status. These visual conventions of Persian art, usually laden, as here, with Neoplatonic symbolism, crystallized in the royal cities of Tabriz and then Herat at the turn of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and endured for another years in the court paintings of Iran, Turkey, and India. Public Domain. Calligrapher: Ja'far Baisunghuri active first half 15th century.

Author: Nizami — Date: A. Geography: Made in present-day Afghanistan, Herat. Medium: Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper. Dimensions: Page: H. Classification: Codices. Accession Number: Essays The Art of the Timurid Period ca. Timelines Central and North Asia, A. Browse the Collection. Signature: Colophon signed by Ja'far, "at Herat" and dated A.

Style: Nasta'liq, naskha, and kufic Translation: The architectural inscriptions in Arabic on gold bands are translated as follows: under the dome: The Prophet -may God pray for him and bless him- said: "Your welfare comes from your knowledge of the Qur'an, and its knowledge is veracity. Minaret, upper band: Allah is the greatest. Minaret, lower band: The prayer is the pillar of religion Niche in back wall, in kufic script: The reign is God's only.

Over side door, in kufic script: The recollection of the encounter is upon Marking: Calligraphed by Ja'far with dedication to Prince Baisunghur d. Prince Baisunghur, Herat, present-day Afghanistan —d. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Denny, Walter B. How to Read Islamic Carpets. Department Islamic Art 15, Illuminated manuscripts Geographic Location Afghanistan Related Objects.

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The Story of Layla and Majnun

Ja'far Baisunghuri. This splendid painting is from a manuscript of the frequently illustrated story of Laila and Majnun by the twelfth-century Persian poet Nizami. It was commissioned by the Timurid prince Baisunghur of Herat, one of the greatest bibliophiles in all Islamic history, who gathered at his court the very best painters from Baghdad, Tabriz, Shiraz, and Samarkand to illustrate his matchless collection of books. This illustration depicts Qais, the future "mad one" Majnun for love, and Laila, his beloved, who meet for the first time as children at a mosque school. The painting underscores the closely related aesthetics of figural painting and abstract calligraphy, architectural tiling and royal carpet weaving in traditional Islamic civilization, united here in a visual symphony of flat but dramatically colored patterns. The scene depicts the child lovers framed in the mosque's prayer niche in order to emphasize their mystical status. These visual conventions of Persian art, usually laden, as here, with Neoplatonic symbolism, crystallized in the royal cities of Tabriz and then Herat at the turn of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and endured for another years in the court paintings of Iran, Turkey, and India.

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The Graves of Layla and Majnun (India)

Qays and Layla fall in love with each other when they are young, but when they grow up Layla's father doesn't allow them to be together. Long before Nizami, the legend circulated in anecdotal forms in Iranian akhbar. The anecdotes are mostly very short, only loosely connected, and show little or no plot development. Nizami collected both secular and mystical sources about Majnun and portrayed a vivid picture of the famous lovers. Many imitations have been contrived of Nizami's work, several of which are original literary works in their own right, including Amir Khusrow Dehlavi 's Majnun o Leyli completed in , and Jami 's version, completed in , amounts to 3, couplets. Other notable reworkings are by Maktabi Shirazi , Hatefi d.

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The Story of Layla and Majnun: The Idealization of Love

See the full list. Taking the leap out of the classic folklore, the story is set in today's time in Kashmir where Laila Majnu have problems relevant to the youth of today. While dealing with their feuding families a passionate love story unravels. A man and woman fell in love and immediately got married.

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According to the local legend, the famous lovers Laila and Majnu died here. A fair, held annually in the month of June, is attended by hundreds of couples and newlyweds. Many people associate this Mazar with the lovers Laila and Majnun. According to them, Laila-Qais were from Sindh and came to this place escaping from the clutches of Laila's parents and her brother, who were against love of Laila-Majnun.

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