FUKUOKA THE ONE STRAW REVOLUTION PDF

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Fukuoka developed ideas that went against the conventional grain Long before the American Michael Pollan, he was making the connections between intensive agriculture, unheal. Long before the American Michael Pollan, he was making the connections between intensive agriculture, unhealthy eating habits and a whole destructive economy based on oil. His holistic message is needed now more than ever as we search for new ways of approaching the environment, our community and life.

It is time for us all to join his 'non-movement. Yet his success in yields is comparable to more resource-intensive methods…The method is now being widely adopted to vegetate arid areas. His books, such as The One-Straw Revolution , have been inspirational to cultivators the world over. At the same time, it is a spiritual memoir of a man whose innovative system of cultivating the earth reflects a deep faith in the wholeness and balance of the natural world. It is an inspiring, necessary book about agriculture because it is not just about agriculture.

Make your way carefully through these fields. Dragonflies and moths fly up in a flurry. Honeybees buzz from blossom to blossom. Part the leaves and you will see Insects, spiders, frogs, lizards, and many other small animals bustling about in the cool shade.

Moles and earthworms burrow beneath the surface. This is a balanced ricefield ecosystem. Insect and plant communities maintain a stable relationship here.

It is not uncommon for a plant disease to sweep through this region and leave the crops in my fields unaffected. And now look over at the neighbor's field for a moment. The weeds have all been wiped out by herbicides and cultivation. The soil animals and insects have been exterminated by poison. The earth has been burned clean of organic matter and micro-organisms by chemical fertilizers. In the summer you see farmers at work in the fields These rice fields—which have been farmed continuously for over 1, years—have now been laid waste by the exploitive farming practices of a single generation.

It is the same picture as that laid out by Michael Pollan in Botany of Desire and his other works, by permaculture and organic farming experts. It's crazy and the toll on the earth, the agricultural workers and those who consume this produce is still not fully known.

Except that it is deadly, especially for workers, the soil and the multiple layers of life that once abounded here -- those things least valued by capital. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again.

Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Fukuoka demonstrates how the way we look at farming influences the way we look at health, the school, nature, nutrition, spiritual health and life itself.

He joins the healing of the land to the process of purifying the human spirit and proposes a way of life and a way of farming in which such healing can take place. Get A Copy. Paperback , 14th Impression , pages. Published by Other India Press first published More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The One-Straw Revolution , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about The One-Straw Revolution. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The One-Straw Revolution. The author writes that he is a farmer in Japan who gets rice yields that meet or eclipse the most highly productive regions in Japan, yet he: - uses no artificial fertilizer - does not plow - does not sow seed but rather tosses it on the ground and forgets it - does not weed - does no insect control - works far fewer hours than those who use the above His descriptions of his methods are interwoven with his overall life philosophy, which seemed to echo Taoist and Buddhism themes more than anything else.

I found this book very interesting. I think it's translated from Japanese. View all 7 comments. Jun 26, Becca rated it it was amazing. So if you crossed Yoda with Joel Salatin and made him a laboratory scientist with a Japanese rice-grain-vegetables-citrus farm, you'd get a rough and awkward parody of Fukuoka Sensei. Really, to capture this guy's wit and humility and flashing intelligence, you really need to read the book.

Possibly over and over. Outside would be best. In Japan-- perfect. So, if I may debase his great ideas with my little summary, the idea of the book is that People Mess Up Nature. Even good farming practices, li So if you crossed Yoda with Joel Salatin and made him a laboratory scientist with a Japanese rice-grain-vegetables-citrus farm, you'd get a rough and awkward parody of Fukuoka Sensei. Even good farming practices, like pruning, mulching, weeding, flooding, and composting have only become necessary because we've messed up the way nature thrives on its own.

Fukuoka Sensei experimented for years on his small farm, slowly pruning out all the practices of farming that have been thought necessary for millenia. The result is a naturally harmonious and productive way of farming that he calls, with the humility of a true Zen master, Do-Nothing Farming.

Acolytes arrive at his farm expecting that Do-Nothing means really not doing anything. It actually means lots of work: much more difficult than following formulas or procedures or practices. It requires accurate awareness of the natural world, a precise understand of the specific natural processes at work in the spot you are trying to cultivate, and also a good deal of inner work-- in the farmer.

And from the inner world of the farmer, a new view on the world's problems. Maybe we need to realize that we can thrive on less.

That we ignore the bounty that nature is willing to shower upon us every season, and choose to eat with our heads servings of carbohydrates, 6 of proteins, 5 of fruit, check! Seasonal, local, handmade, in communities, with gratitude. So I thought it was a far-sighted, insightful, wise, funny, extraordinarily persuasive little book. I'd like to carefully incorporate his ideas about do-nothing farming maybe skipping the maggots-for-dinner proposal into my tiny garden, or at least into my awareness of the natural world and my place in it.

This is really like a 4-star book combined with a 2-star one. This book starts out fabulously, all about simpler existence and simple farming. Life without fucking everything up, basically, and it's very inspiring. But then the author gets increasingly preachy, and goes on a Zen-and-the-Art-of-Motorcycle-Maintenance -type patting himself on the back Ultimately I tend to largely agree with Fukuoka's life philosophy, but he needs to tone it down a bit.

I This is really like a 4-star book combined with a 2-star one. You can download it FREE. Find the link under the Wikepedia entry for "Masanobu Fukuoka" View 1 comment. I work somewhat related to plant breeding and farming so I'm always interested to read something from someone who has something different to say. Sadly and this is getting more and more common with 'alternative' farming that different thing often doesn't hold up to closer scrutiny, as it does here.

Fukuoka advocates his idea of natural farming important his distinction: it's not 'abandonment' farming, it does require work , summarised in 5 points: no cultivation, no chemical fertilizer or prep I work somewhat related to plant breeding and farming so I'm always interested to read something from someone who has something different to say. Fukuoka advocates his idea of natural farming important his distinction: it's not 'abandonment' farming, it does require work , summarised in 5 points: no cultivation, no chemical fertilizer or prepared compost, no weeding by tillage or herbicides, and no dependence on chemicals.

He says that it's better than what other Japanese farmers are doing, he has to do less work and gets the same yield. Now he doesn't say what farmers in his area are getting, but we can do the math! Here's what he's getting: Mr. Fukuoka harvests between 18 and 22 bushels 1, to 1, pounds of rice per quarter acre. This yield is approximately the same as is produced by either the chemical or the traditional method in his area.

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The One-Straw Revolution

While our office is shut down due to COVID, we encourage you to purchase this title through bookshop. Click here to order. At the same time, it is a spiritual memoir of a man whose innovative system of cultivating the earth reflects a deep faith in the wholeness and balance of the natural world. It is an inspiring, necessary book about agriculture because it is not just about agriculture. Trained as a scientist, Fukuoka rejected both modern agribusiness and centuries of agricultural lore. Only the ignorant could write off Fukuoka, who died two years ago at the age of 95, as a deluded or nostalgic dreamer Fukuoka developed ideas that went against the conventional grain

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Masanobu Fukuoka

Fukuoka developed ideas that went against the conventional grain Long before the American Michael Pollan, he was making the connections between intensive agriculture, unheal. Long before the American Michael Pollan, he was making the connections between intensive agriculture, unhealthy eating habits and a whole destructive economy based on oil. His holistic message is needed now more than ever as we search for new ways of approaching the environment, our community and life. It is time for us all to join his 'non-movement.

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He was a proponent of no-till , no-herbicide grain cultivation farming methods traditional to many indigenous cultures, [1] from which he created a particular method of farming, commonly referred to as "natural farming" or "do-nothing farming". Fukuoka was the author of several books, scientific papers and other publications, and was featured in television documentaries and interviews from the s onwards. He was an outspoken advocate of the value of observing nature's principles. Fukuoka was born on 2 February in Iyo, Ehime , Japan, the second son of Kameichi Fukuoka, an educated and wealthy land owner and local leader.

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